Justice system scores poorly in EU rankings

Greece
Mon, 12 Jun 2023 6:50 GMT
The Greek justice system may have many state officials, judges and lawyers, but fails to work efficiently for society as a whole, according to the EU Justice Scoreboard 2023 of the European Commission.
Justice system scores poorly in EU rankings

The Greek justice system may have many state officials, judges and lawyers, but fails to work efficiently for society as a whole, according to the EU Justice Scoreboard 2023 of the European Commission. 

The report notes huge delays in the adjudication of cases, with new cases constantly piling up. Additionally, the public have little faith in the judiciary because they believe it is politicized and influenced by commercial interests.

The results were measured on the basis of specific indicators set for all member-states and reviewed annually.

Greece lags behind most notably in the length of time required to administer justice but also in the manner the courts operate as it appears that neither judges nor attorneys make adequate use of modern technologies.

Nonetheless, the state budget is investing enough in the justice sector in relation to Greece’s economic situation.

Greece spends 0.35% of its budget on the judicial system, which is significant in relation to its gross national income and above the EU average.

Greece is third in the EU in terms of the number of judges per 100,000 inhabitants, with around 37 judges.

Croatia leads with some 42 judges per 100,000 while Ireland has proportionally the fewest at around four per 100,000.

Greece is third in the EU regarding the number of lawyers, with around 400 per 100,000.

Luxembourg has the most number of lawyers (500 per 100,000) ahead of Cyprus (470 per 100,000). Sweden has the fewest with just over 50 per 100,000.

In Greece, it typically takes about 700 days to conclude a civil, administrative or commercial issue in the first instance, while for Denmark it is fewer than 50 days. The EU average is similarly less than 50, albeit a little higher than in Denmark.

Greece also has the second-longest waiting time (700 days) after Cyprus (more than 900) for a case to be heard compared to other EU countries.

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